NewEnergyNews: THE STORAGE PART OF CCS

NewEnergyNews

Gleanings from the web and the world, condensed for convenience, illustrated for enlightenment, arranged for impact...

The challenge now: To make every day Earth Day.

YESTERDAY

  • SoCalEdison’s Newest Plan To Mitigate Wildfires
  • THE DAY BEFORE

  • Weekend Video: New Energy Means New Jobs
  • Weekend Video: Better Communication About The Climate Crisis
  • Weekend Video: VW Affirms Driving Is Ready To Go Electric
  • THE DAY BEFORE THE DAY BEFORE

  • FRIDAY WORLD HEADLINE-The Climate Crisis Is The World’s Biggest Worry – Survey
  • FRIDAY WORLD HEADLINE-Record New Energy Global Growth In 2020
  • THE DAY BEFORE THAT

    THINGS-TO-THINK-ABOUT WEDNESDAY, April 7:

  • TTTA Wednesday-ORIGINAL REPORTING: The Search For A Successor Solar Policy
  • TTTA Wednesday-Local Governments Still Driving New Energy
  • THE LAST DAY UP HERE

  • Monday Study: PG&E’s Plans To Mitigate Wildfires
  • --------------------------

    --------------------------

    Founding Editor Herman K. Trabish

    --------------------------

    --------------------------

    Some details about NewEnergyNews and the man behind the curtain: Herman K. Trabish, Agua Dulce, CA., Doctor with my hands, Writer with my head, Student of New Energy and Human Experience with my heart

    email: herman@NewEnergyNews.net

    -------------------

    -------------------

      A tip of the NewEnergyNews cap to Phillip Garcia for crucial assistance in the design implementation of this site. Thanks, Phillip.

    -------------------

    Pay a visit to the HARRY BOYKOFF page at Basketball Reference, sponsored by NewEnergyNews and Oil In Their Blood.

  • ---------------
  • THINGS-TO-THINK-ABOUT WEDNESDAY, April 14:
  • ORIGINAL REPORTING: The Differences Between Energy Markets
  • Biden Admin To Ensure Jobs Plan Protects Equity – DOE Head

    Saturday, June 30, 2007

    THE STORAGE PART OF CCS

    The problem is that carbon-capture-and-sequestration (CCS) adds to the expense of using coal. Expectations that it might pay for itself by enhancing oil field recovery or pushing up coal bed methane may or may not pay off. Which is why research like this is welcome.

    In a related story to be covered here next week, major oil companies have cancelled plans for CO2 sesquestration/enhanced recovery projects, raising more questions about the dream-technology's viability.

    Feds: Storing Carbon Dioxide Underground Can Work
    Andrea Thompson, June 26, 2007 (LiveScience via Yahoo News)

    WHO
    Researchers, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL)
    one version of sequestration (click to enlarge)

    WHAT
    Research into sequestration of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in coal bed seams and oil wells, the “storage” part of the phrase commonly used to define the processing of “clean” coal, “carbon capture and storage.”

    WHEN
    Field projects testing the “geologic” sequestration of GHG emissions are ongoing asare these controlled environment studies.

    WHERE
    NETL has offices in Pittsburgh, PA, Tulsa, OK, Albany, OR, Morgantown, WV, and Fairbanks, AK. The geologic sequestration project seems to be out of the Pittsburgh office.

    WHY
    - Geologic sequestration of GHG emissions like CO2 in coal beds would release coal bed methane for use as a fuel. Pumping the GHGs into oil wells would enhance the well’s production. Both coal beds and oil wells are hypothesized to be safe sequestration sites.
    - NETL researchers have constructed a controlled environment mimicking pressures, temperatures and other factors of geologic sequestration to better evaluate the idea. Another recent study found sequestration effective but observed that toxic metals released in the process could contaminate ground water.
    - World geologic sequestration capacity, if possible ground water contamination does not eliminate potential sites (A BIG IF), is estimated at 3 trillion tons.
    and another (click to enlarge)

    QUOTES
    Reserchers: “Changes in water chemistry and the potential for mobilizing toxic trace elements from coal beds are potentially important factors to be considered when evaluating deep, unmineable coal seams for CO2 sequestration, though it is also possible that, considering the depth of the injection, that such effects might be harmless…”

    0 Comments:

    Post a Comment

    << Home