NewEnergyNews: NEW ENERGY STATE OF THE STATES

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    Founding Editor Herman K. Trabish

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  • MONDAY’S STUDY AT NewEnergyNews, April 12:
  • SoCalEdison’s Newest Plan To Mitigate Wildfires

    Friday, April 29, 2011

    NEW ENERGY STATE OF THE STATES

    State Policies Key to Clean Energy Development
    26 April 2011 (World of Renewables)

    "States’ policies are important to solar and wind energy development and in reducing energy use says a new report from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)…

    "Building on an emerging body of literature identifying connections between state policy and renewable energy, [State of the States 2010: The Role of Policy in Clean Energy Market Transformation] quantifies the connection between state clean energy policies, renewable energy development and actual reductions in energy use. Renewable energy use increased 3 percent across the United States in 2010, the report says."

    click to enlarge

    "It is the first time energy efficiency has been considered in this type of analysis, and the report shows significant connections between reduced energy use and building codes, electricity prices and, in some cases, energy efficiency resource standards. Even though state policies might apply to a wide variety of renewable energy resources, the analysis shows that most often there’s a relationship between policy and solar and wind development. So, if states tailor policy to other resources, it might help increase development of renewable energy sources in addition to solar and wind…

    "To track the progress of the states and regions toward a clean energy economy, NREL also provided the analysis and findings for DOE’s 2009 U.S. State Clean Energy Data Book…Published in October 2010, [it] summarizes the status of state-level energy efficiency and renewable energy developments and supporting policy implementation…It identifies the states and regions leading in overall renewable energy capacity and energy efficiency policy [including]…"


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    "…[1] In 2009, Maine had the largest percentage—23 percent—of non-hydro renewable generation, mostly from bioenergy…[2] Texas leads the country in total non-hydro installed renewable energy capacity…[3] California is the leader in solar energy installed capacity…[4] Oregon, California, Illinois, Iowa, Maine, Montana, New Hampshire, and Pennsylvania have the strictest building codes, which require high efficiency in commercial and residential construction.

    "NREL provided the analysis for both the State of the States 2010 report and the U.S. State Clean Energy Data Book under its Clean Energy Policy Analyses [CEPA] project…"

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