NewEnergyNews: TODAY’S STUDY, 9-30: THE INCREDIBLE VALUE OF WIND OFF THE EAST COAST

NewEnergyNews

Gleanings from the web and the world, condensed for convenience, illustrated for enlightenment, arranged for impact...

The challenge now: To make every day Earth Day.

YESTERDAY

  • Weekend Video: New Energy Means New Jobs
  • Weekend Video: Better Communication About The Climate Crisis
  • Weekend Video: VW Affirms Driving Is Ready To Go Electric
  • THE DAY BEFORE

  • FRIDAY WORLD HEADLINE-The Climate Crisis Is The World’s Biggest Worry – Survey
  • FRIDAY WORLD HEADLINE-Record New Energy Global Growth In 2020
  • THE DAY BEFORE THE DAY BEFORE

    THINGS-TO-THINK-ABOUT WEDNESDAY, April 7:

  • TTTA Wednesday-ORIGINAL REPORTING: The Search For A Successor Solar Policy
  • TTTA Wednesday-Local Governments Still Driving New Energy
  • THE DAY BEFORE THAT

  • Monday Study: PG&E’s Plans To Mitigate Wildfires
  • THE LAST DAY UP HERE

  • Weekend Video: Denial Goes Oh So Wrong
  • Weekend Video: Solar On Schools Can Pay For Teachers
  • Weekend Video: DOE Secretary of the Solutions Department Jennifer Granholm
  • --------------------------

    --------------------------

    Founding Editor Herman K. Trabish

    --------------------------

    --------------------------

    Some details about NewEnergyNews and the man behind the curtain: Herman K. Trabish, Agua Dulce, CA., Doctor with my hands, Writer with my head, Student of New Energy and Human Experience with my heart

    email: herman@NewEnergyNews.net

    -------------------

    -------------------

      A tip of the NewEnergyNews cap to Phillip Garcia for crucial assistance in the design implementation of this site. Thanks, Phillip.

    -------------------

    Pay a visit to the HARRY BOYKOFF page at Basketball Reference, sponsored by NewEnergyNews and Oil In Their Blood.

  • ---------------
  • MONDAY’S STUDY AT NewEnergyNews, April 12:
  • SoCalEdison’s Newest Plan To Mitigate Wildfires

    Thursday, September 30, 2010

    TODAY’S STUDY, 9-30: THE INCREDIBLE VALUE OF WIND OFF THE EAST COAST

    Untapped Wealth: Offshore Wind Can Deliver Cleaner, More Affordable Energy and More Jobs Than Offshore Oil
    Simon Mahan, Isaac Pearlman. Jacqueline Savitz, September 2010 (Oceana)

    Executive Summary

    Interest in offshore drilling—and the public’s perspective on it—has ebbed and flooded like the tides over the years. In 2008, with long-standing moratoria on new offshore drilling in place, public and political interest seemed at an all-time low. High gasoline prices later that year led to a public demand to “drill, baby, drill”, and those long-term protections were ended in the fervor of heated elections. Oil fever seemed to persist until April, 2010, when the tides turned again, following what has become known as the worst environmental disaster in U.S. history. In the wake of the Deepwater drilling disaster and its images of oiled beaches and struggling Gulf of Mexico wildlife, public opinion has returned to a stronger-than-over opposition to offshore drilling.

    It is past time for a close examination of the role our offshore areas play in providing us with the energy we need. Do we continue to expand offshore drilling, in spite of its now-undeniable risks, or are there better options?

    This report looks closely at that question, especially as it pertains to the Atlantic Coast. The moratoria that once protected this coast no longer do so, and President Obama has spotlighted the Mid and South Atlantic for oil and gas exploration. Our analysis shows clearly that focusing our investments on clean energy—specifically offshore wind energy—would be more cost effective, more beneficial in job creation, and better for the environment in a variety of ways than offshore oil exploration and development.

    click to enlarge

    Findings

    Offshore Wind Potential

    - A small fraction of U.S. renewable energy resources1 is enough to power the country several times over. This could be done in a cost-effective way that minimizes carbon dioxide emissions which drive climate change and threaten our oceans.

    - A modest investment in offshore wind could supply almost half the current electricity generation on the East Coast.

    - Delaware, Massachusetts and North Carolina could generate enough electricity from offshore wind to equal current electricity generation, entirely eliminating the need for fossil fuel based electric generation.

    - New Jersey, Virginia and South Carolina could supply 92%, 83% and 64% of their current electricity generation with offshore wind, respectively. In all these states, wind could provide more energy than the states currently get from fossil fuels.

    - Offshore wind power offers more environmental benefits and fewer impacts than traditional fuels such as nuclear power, natural gas, coal and oil.

    click to enlarge

    Offshore Wind vs. OffshOre Oil

    For the East Coast, we found that offshore wind would provide much greater potential than offshore oil and gas combined. This includes potential to power home heating, power generation or transportation.

    Based on conservative assumptions for offshore wind and generous assumptions for offshore oil and natural gas, this study found that by investing in offshore wind on the East Coast, rather than offshore oil and gas, Americans would get more energy for less money. We show in this report that offshore wind can generate at least 127 GW of power conservatively. This would equal current electricity generation in states where it is located, almost as much as is generated using fossil fuels in those states. The assumptions and methodology are described in the Oceana Technical Notes.

    - On the Atlantic Coast, offshore wind could generate about 30 percent more electricity than could be generated by the technically available offshore oil and gas.

    - The Atlantic Coast’s offshore wind energy potential could generate enough electricity to heat more homes than exist in that region. In fact, the Atlantic Coast’s offshore wind potential is so great, that it could supply enough electricity to heat every home in the country, and then some.

    - Offshore wind from the Atlantic could power nearly twice as many vehicles as new offshore oil and gas from the same area. The Atlantic Coast’s offshore wind energy potential is so great that it could power more cars than exist in the region. More than 112.5 million electric cars could be powered by wind, which is about half of all the cars and trucks on the road in the entire country. Accelerating both the wind transition and vehicle electrification now could allow vehicles to begin to use the offshore wind power as soon as it becomes available on the grid.

    - On the Atlantic Coast alone, the United States could install at least 127 gigawatts of wind power, an amount roughly equivalent to European projections for that continent by 2030.

    click to enlarge

    - Developing 127 gigawatts offshore wind energy capacity over 20 years would provide energy at a cost of about $36 billion less than the production of economically recoverable new offshore oil and natural gas.

    - Clean energy production creates three times more jobs per dollar invested than fossil fuel production.

    - Offshore wind development off the Atlantic coast could create between 133,000 and 212,000 jobs annually in the United States – more than three times as many jobs than new offshore oil and natural gas development is expected to create.

    - In the South Atlantic, offshore wind could heat more homes than offshore oil and natural gas resources combined for less than half of the price. Electricity from offshore wind could displace an amount equivalent to the electricity generated by 100% of the oil and nearly 75% of the natural gas in the South Atlantic states.

    - In the Mid-Atlantic, offshore wind could provide an amount of electricity equivalent to the electricity generated by all fossil fuels used in that region. Wind from offshore could heat about seven times more homes, produce three times more power, or power four times more cars as the new offshore oil and gas resources combined.

    - In the North-Atlantic, offshore wind could provide an amount of electricity equivalent to the electricity generated by oil and natural gas as well as some of coal powered generation. The wind from offshore could heat four times more homes than offshore oil and gas resources combined. Offshore wind energy in the North Atlantic could power more cars or generate more electricity than new offshore oil and gas resources combined.

    click to enlarge

    Based on MMS estimates of undiscovered, economically recoverable oil and gas resource at $110/barrel, $11.74/mcf, and DOE estimates for offshore wind costs ranging from 10.6 – 13.1 ¢/kWh. Heating based on DOE data for average homes and primary space heating fuels.

    Electrifying based on 10,810 BTU per kWh from oil and gas and 11,020 kWh consumed per home annually. Car estimates based on 31.5 MPG gasoline, 121.5 cubic feet natural gas per gallon equivalent, 2.9 miles per kilowatt hour and 12,000 miles driven annually per car. See Oceana Technical Notes for methodology.

    click to enlarge

    Offshore Wind – Doing the Work of Oil and Natural Gas Better, for Less

    General Findings

    - Offshore wind power is located near population centers where electricity demand is highest. Coastal states account for more than three-quarters of U.S. electricity consumption. Other renewable energy is further from these high-demand areas.

    - Offshore wind power is less expensive than many alternatives. In some cases, offshore wind could actually lower electric bills.

    - Offshore wind creates more jobs than offshore drilling. Long-term jobs would be created to support offshore wind development for skilled workers and scientists, including electricians, meteorologists, welders, and turbine operators just to name a few.

    - Offshore wind technology can help build the U.S. economy. While the U.S. has not yet installed any offshore wind farms, Europe has been doing so for 20 years and has become the leading supplier of offshore wind turbines. Building our own domestic manufacturing base would strengthen our economy, allow U.S. expenditures to remain here at home, and allow the U.S. to become an offshore wind technology exporter.

    - Offshore wind projects should be designed to minimize environmental impacts by using new techniques and technology in the construction, operation and decommissioning process, and by protecting the environment in the siting process.

    - Choosing wind instead of oil and gas, rather than taking an “all-of-the-above” approach, will increase efficiency and lower costs for power production overall.

    click to enlarge

    State By State Highlights

    click to enlarge

    Delaware
    Delaware could generate more electricity from offshore wind energy than the state currently generates from all other sources. Offshore wind from the state’s waters could power approximately 937,000 average homes annually. At least 2.8 GW of offshore wind potential is available in Delaware waters. That’s enough energy to meet the current household energy generation of Delaware and Rhode Island combined with an energy surplus. While there is an initial investment cost for installation of offshore wind farms, eliminating fossil fuel consumption for electricity generation in Delaware would save the state $274 million annually on fuel costs.

    Massachusetts
    Massachusetts has the third highest electricity rates on the East Coast. The state could generate more electricity from offshore wind power than its total current power generation. Massachusetts’ coastline would allow for the development of 13.8 gigawatts of offshore wind power. This offshore wind power could generate at least 130 percent of Massachusetts’ current electricity generation, powering approximately 5 million average homes annually. With approximately 2.5 million homes, offshore wind power would be enough to supply Massachusetts with double the amount of energy needed to power all of its households. The offshore wind potential off the coast of Massachusetts could eliminate fossil fuel consumption for electricity generation in the state. While there is an initial investment cost for installation of offshore wind farms, eliminating the use of fossil fuel consumption would save about $2.1 billion annually on fuel costs. In addition, offshore wind could displace about 77 million metric tons of carbon dioxide.

    click to enlarge

    North Carolina
    North Carolina ranks first on the East Coast for offshore wind energy potential with at least 38 GW of potential offshore wind energy waiting to be developed. The federal waters off the state’s coast represent nearly 22 percent of the East Coast’s offshore wind generating capacity, and could supply nearly 12.7 million homes with clean, offshore wind power—or all the homes in North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia and Virginia combined. Offshore wind power off North Carolina waters could generate more electricity than is currently generated in the entire state from all fuels combined. By investing in this resource the state could move away from coal, oil and natural gas altogether and save $2.6 billion annually on fuel costs.

    New Jersey
    New Jersey has the third best offshore wind resource on the East Coast based on total energy potential with at least 16 GW of wind energy. The state could generate 92 percent of its electricity from offshore wind—which would eliminate its fossil fuel consumption for electricity generation. In addition, offshore wind would create enough energy to power approximately 5.3 million average homes annually, almost twice the number of households currently in the state, and could displace about 81.4 million metric tons of carbon dioxide.

    click to enlarge

    Virginia
    Offshore wind from Virginia’s coast could generate enough electricity to eliminate the need for all of the state’s fossil fuel power plants. Virginia’s 16 GW could generate at least 83 percent of the state’s current electricity generation, enough to power approximately 5.5 million average homes annually, almost twice the number of households currently in the state.

    South Carolina
    South Carolina ranks second on the East Coast for offshore wind potential. Enough electricity could be generated by offshore wind off South Carolina to eliminate all of its fossil fuel power plants. South Carolina’s coastline would allow for the development of 19.2 gigawatts of offshore wind power, approximately 64 percent of the state’s current electricity generation, and enough to power about 5.9 million average homes annually—five times the number of households currently in the state. In addition, offshore wind could displace about 46.9 million metric tons of carbon dioxide.

    click to enlarge

    Rhode Island
    Rhode Island has the fourth highest electricity rates on the East Coast and the state gets 97 percent of its electricity from natural gas. Even the small amount of area available for offshore wind development could supply 700 megawatts of power, at least 38 percent of Rhode Island’s electricity, and enough to power approximately253,000 average homes annually. With a about 400,000 households as of 2000, offshore wind energy could provide enough power to supply at least half of Rhode Island homes. In addition, offshore wind power could displace about 1.1 million metric tons of carbon dioxide.

    Maryland
    Maryland could generate more than a third of its electricity from offshore wind power. This would be enough to eliminate the use of oil and natural gas for power generation in the state. Maryland’s coastline would allow for the development of 4.7 awatts of offshore wind power. This offshore wind power could generate at least 36 percent of Maryland’s current electricity generation, enough to meet the electricity generation of all the homes in the state. In addition, offshore wind power would displace about 23.7 million metric tons of carbon dioxide.

    click to enlarge

    Florida
    Offshore wind power could supply more than 10 GW, or enough energy to more than replace petroleum use in Florida’s electric industry. Florida spends nearly $1.5 billion annually on oil for electricity generation, and consumes more oil for electricity generation than any other state in the country. Florida’s Atlantic coastline would allow for the development of at least 10.3 gigawatts of offshore wind energy, enough to power approximately 3.1 million average homes annually, about half the number of homes in the state. In addition, offshore wind power could replace about 24.7 million metric tons of carbon dioxide.

    New York
    In New York, more than $658 million is spent annually on petroleum for electricity generation—the second highest amount on the East Coast. Offshore wind could more than eliminate New York’s petroleum-based electricity generation. New York’s coastline would allow for the development of 4.7 gigawatts of offshore wind power in economically recoverable areas of the Atlantic Ocean. This offshore wind power could generate at least 12 percent of New York’s current electricity generation, displace about 23.6 million metric tons of carbon dioxide and power approximately 1.5 million average homes annually.

    click to enlarge

    Recommendations

    Offshore oil and gas drilling poses major risks to diverse economies, such as fishing and tourism, as well as to marine ecosystems, and it does so in exchange for few benefits. While the risks of spills are tremendous as we have seen in the Gulf of Mexico, the benefits of offshore oil and gas are small in comparison to lower risk alternatives such as offshore wind. Investing in offshore wind is therefore a more truly cost-effective approach to generating energy from the oceans. Since developing “all of the above” only increases the costs and delivery times for both wind and oil and gas, we recommend that the United States begin the transition away from offshore fossil fuel development by taking the following steps:

    - Eliminate federal subsidies for fossil fuels and redirect these funds to renewable energies and energy efficiency programs.

    - Stop all new offshore oil and gas drilling to prevent future spills and minimize competition for resources and expertise that will slow the development of offshore wind energy.

    click to enlarge

    - Require leasing of installation vessels for offshore wind turbine construction be given priority so that it is not impeded by offshore oil and natural gas development.

    Renewable energy projects and manufacturers are more likely to proceed if there are consistent, predictable signals from governments and private markets to stimulate investments. Over the past several decades, onshore wind energy in the United States has periodically had access to tax benefits. Unfortunately, these have been short-term commitments, renewed annually, which provide inadequate assurance to those considering long-term investments. When these renewals end, the industry will likely constrict. As a result, fewer planned projects have been completed than what might otherwise occur with a more consistent signal from the government.3 This boom-and-bust, year-to-year uncertainty harms the onshore wind industry and must not be allowed to extend offshore.

    click to enlarge

    In order to create a consistent and predictable environment for offshore wind
    energy, the United States must:

    - Increase and make permanent the tax credit for investment in advanced energy property outlined in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Tax Act of 2009. This legislation extends the 30 percent credit for investment in qualified property used in a qualified advanced energy manufacturing project, but ends in 2012.4 In addition, these tax credits should be extended to manufacturers of offshore wind turbine components and turbine installation vessels.

    - Increase and make permanent the Innovative Technology Loan Guarantee Program for opening, expanding or modernizing facilities to manufacture offshore wind turbine components and extend this program to turbine installation vessel manufacturing.

    click to enlarge

    - Use policy mechanisms that increase the long-term demand for and supply of renewable energies, such as a robust Renewable Electricity Standard or Feed-in Tariffs, Production and Investment Tax Credits, Loan Guarantee programs for renewable energy projects and technology manufacturers and training programs.

    - Accelerate the electrification of the transportation fleet through incentives to automobile manufacturers and purchasers and by building the needed infrastructure such as charging stations to allow maximal use of this new technology.

    0 Comments:

    Post a Comment

    << Home