NewEnergyNews: THE COST OF NEW ENERGY

NewEnergyNews

Gleanings from the web and the world, condensed for convenience, illustrated for enlightenment, arranged for impact...

The challenge now: To make every day Earth Day.

YESTERDAY

  • Monday Study – Solar Net Metering Takes Centerstage
  • THE DAY BEFORE

  • Weekend Video: Have It All With The THRIVE Act
  • Weekend Video: New Energy Overview
  • Weekend Video: Game-Changing Battery Breakthrough
  • THE DAY BEFORE THE DAY BEFORE

  • FRIDAY WORLD HEADLINE-Climate-Driven Extreme Weather Worsening
  • FRIDAY WORLD HEADLINE-Global New Energy Jobs To Grow 500%
  • THE DAY BEFORE THAT

    THINGS-TO-THINK-ABOUT WEDNESDAY, July 28:

  • TTTA Wednesday-ORIGINAL REPORTING: Transition To Renewables Up Push For Reliability
  • TTTA Wednesday- Policymakers Back Batteries For Solar
  • THE LAST DAY UP HERE

  • Monday Study – Big Wind Building Around The World
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    Founding Editor Herman K. Trabish

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    Some details about NewEnergyNews and the man behind the curtain: Herman K. Trabish, Agua Dulce, CA., Doctor with my hands, Writer with my head, Student of New Energy and Human Experience with my heart

    email: herman@NewEnergyNews.net

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  • THINGS-TO-THINK-ABOUT WEDNESDAY, August 4:
  • ORIGINAL REPORTING: The Conundrum Of Controlling Rates With Rising Costs
  • The Fight For Tomorrow’s Grid Gets Bigger

    Friday, August 26, 2011

    THE COST OF NEW ENERGY

    Utilities weigh price of power with aging plants and renewable mandates
    Mark Jaffe, August 21, 2011 (Denver Post)

    "…Levelized cost analyses [of energy – all lifetime plant building and operating costs divided by dollars the plant produces for a dollars per megawatt-hour]…rely on assumptions that can make the estimates lower or higher…[F]our levelized cost studies — from government agencies, financial firms and engineering companies — …[make estimates that] vary as much as 100 percent…

    "Standard coal-fired power plants are among the least expensive forms of electricity generation...The cost among the studies ranged from a low of 7.4 cents to 13.5 cents per kilowatt-hour…[but a] 2009 study by the National Research Council titled "The Hidden Costs of Energy" estimated that the pollution impacts of coal — the most polluting of the fossil fuels — added 3.2 cents a kilowatt-hour in 2005, declining to 1.7 cents a kilowatt-hour in 2030 as more electricity comes from cleaner coal plants…[T]hat doesn't count…a cost for carbon emissions…"


    click to enlarge

    "The least-expensive fossil fuel generation in the major cost studies is natural gas…The EIA put the average cost at 6.6 cents a kilowatt-hour in 2016 for a conventional combined-cycle gas plant…The biggest concern with natural gas has been the cost…In the past 10 years, the spot price has been as low as $1.80 per million British thermal units…and as high as $15.38…The average for the decade was $6.07…[A recent] closing price…was $3.89."

    click to enlarge

    "The cheapest renewable-energy source, and one of the least expensive overall, is wind power, with the average cost between 4.4 cents and 11.5 cents a kilowatt-hour…The problem with wind — as with solar — is what is called the "capacity factor." A coal or natural-gas plant will run 70 to 90 percent of the time, constantly generating electricity…A wind farm runs 32 to 42 percent of the time and a solar array generates electricity 22 to 27 percent of the time…

    "Solar energy is the most expensive way to make power — more than twice as expensive as natural gas and wind…[according to] five levelized cost studies…The EIA estimates the cost of a utility-scale solar photovoltaic installation at 19 cents a kilowatt-hour…The cost of solar cells, however, has dropped by more than a quarter since 2001 and is projected to continue to decline. That could bring the levelized cost for photovoltaics to 8 or 9 cents a kilowatt-hour by 2020, according to a study by Greentech Media…"

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