NewEnergyNews

NewEnergyNews

Gleanings from the web and the world, condensed for convenience, illustrated for enlightenment, arranged for impact...

The new challenge: To make every day Earth Day.

YESTERDAY

  • ORIGINAL REPORTING: HAWAII'S UTILITIES PLAN FOR 67% RENEWABLES BY 2030
  • ORIGINAL REPORTING: CAN WARREN BUFFETT'S PACIFICORP BRING THE NORTHWEST'S RENEWABLE RICHES TO MARKET?
  • THE DAY BEFORE

  • ORIGINAL REPORTING: A UTILITY IN THE MAKING: THE MUNICIPALIZATION OF BOULDER, COLORADO
  • ORIGINAL REPORTING: WHAT HAPPENED TO THAT NATIONAL HIGH VOLTAGE TRANSMISSION SYSTEM?
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    GET THE DAILY HEADLINES EMAIL: CLICK HERE TO SUBMIT YOUR EMAIL ADDRESS OR SEND YOUR EMAIL ADDRESS TO: herman@NewEnergyNews.net

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    THE DAY BEFORE THE DAY BEFORE

  • ORIGINAL REPORTING: THE STATE OF THE U.S. WIND INDUSTRY (AND WHAT IT MEANS FOR UTILITIES)
  • ORIGINAL REPORTING: HOW SACRAMENTO'S PUBLIC UTILITY IS GETTING IN THE RESIDENTIAL SOLAR BUSINESS
  • THE DAY BEFORE THAT

  • ORIGINAL REPORTING: HAS APS INVENTED A ROOFTOP SOLAR BUSINESS MODEL FOR UTILITIES?
  • ORIGINAL REPORTING: THE GRID NEEDS INDEPENDENT DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM OPERATORS
  • AND THE DAY BEFORE THAT

  • ORIGINAL REPORTING: HOW SHOULD UTILITIES VALUE SOLAR?
  • ORIGINAL REPORTING: IS PUERTO RICO THE NEW POSTER CHILD FOR THE UTILITY DEATH SPIRAL?
  • THE LAST DAY UP HERE

  • Weekend Video: Reindeer Stresses
  • Weekend Video: Pink Fracking
  • Weekend Video: Fighting Duke For Solar
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    Anne B. Butterfield of Daily Camera and Huffington Post, is an occasional contributor to NewEnergyNews

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    Some of Anne's contributions:

  • Another Tipping Point: US Coal Supply Decline So Real Even West Virginia Concurs (REPORT), November 26, 2013
  • SOLAR FOR ME BUT NOT FOR THEE ~ Xcel's Push to Undermine Rooftop Solar, September 20, 2013
  • NEW BILLS AND NEW BIRDS in Colorado's recent session, May 20, 2013
  • Lies, damned lies and politicians (October 8, 2012)
  • Colorado's Elegant Solution to Fracking (April 23, 2012)
  • Shale Gas: From Geologic Bubble to Economic Bubble (March 15, 2012)
  • Taken for granted no more (February 5, 2012)
  • The Republican clown car circus (January 6, 2012)
  • Twenty-Somethings of Colorado With Skin in the Game (November 22, 2011)
  • Occupy, Xcel, and the Mother of All Cliffs (October 31, 2011)
  • Boulder Can Own Its Power With Distributed Generation (June 7, 2011)
  • The Plunging Cost of Renewables and Boulder's Energy Future (April 19, 2011)
  • Paddling Down the River Denial (January 12, 2011)
  • The Fox (News) That Jumped the Shark (December 16, 2010)
  • Click here for an archive of Butterfield columns

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    Some details about NewEnergyNews and the man behind the curtain: Herman K. Trabish, Agua Dulce, CA., Doctor with my hands, Writer with my head, Student of New Energy and Human Experience with my heart

    email: herman@NewEnergyNews.net

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    Your intrepid reporter

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      A tip of the NewEnergyNews cap to Phillip Garcia for crucial assistance in the design implementation of this site. Thanks, Phillip.

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    Pay a visit to the HARRY BOYKOFF page at Basketball Reference, sponsored by NewEnergyNews and Oil In Their Blood.

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  • Tuesday, October 09, 2012

    On The Road Reading - What to Make of Geothermal’s Numbers; Is the potential of geothermal energy starting to turn into growth?

    Herman K. Trabish, May 24, 2012 (Greentech Media)

    The Geothermal Energy Association’s newest report on global growth is an admirable effort on putting on a happy face -- but its numbers tell another story.

    The association reports, for instance, that in 2010 geothermal energy generated “twice the amount of electricity as solar energy did worldwide.” The world’s installed grid-connected PV capacity went from 7.4 gigawatts at the end of 2009, to 16.8 gigawatts at the end of 2010, to 29.7 gigawatts of grid-connected PV at the end of 2011.

    The world’s installed geothermal capacity, as of May 2012, was 11,224 megawatts (11.2 gigawatts), up from 10.7 gigawatts of installed capacity in 2009 (according to the IEA). It would appear geothermal did have the lead sometime in 2010, but comparing the sectors' growth rates is not flattering to geothermal. (Geothermal obviously has an advantage when it comes to generating kilowatt-hours due to its higher capacity factor.)

    The telling measure is geothermal’s U.S. performance. According to the GEA report, utility-scale geothermal originated in the U.S. in the 1960s. The U.S. “remains the world leader with approximately 3,187 megawatts of installed capacity,” but the GEA reported it brought only “approximately 91 megawatts of capacity on-line between 2011 and early 2012.”

    That’s far less than the 1,855 megawatts of photovoltaics deployed in the U.S. in 2011.

    The U.S. wind industry added 6,816 megawatts (6.8 gigawatts) of new capacity in 2011, a 30 percent increase over the previous year’s growth.

    There is, however, cause for optimism in the geothermal industry. While GEA President Karl Gawell noted that “growth in the United States is still hindered by uncertainty about the direction of government policy” (an observation echoed by leaders in the solar, wind and natural gas sectors in 2012), the rest of the world plans to seize the geothermal opportunity.

    The Turkey Geothermal Association estimates, according to GEA, that its industry will grow from 100 megawatts of installed capacity to 500 megawatts by 2015. Kenya, with 202 megawatts of installed capacity, is developing fourteen new sites. And Indonesia, which is situated on the famed ring of fire and is estimated to have 27,510 megawatts of geothermal potential, intends to build its installed capacity to 5,000 megawatts by 2025.

    A recent GTM interview with EnergySource President and CEO Dave Watson, who just commissioned the 49-megawatt Hudson Ranch I project in California’s potential-rich Salton Sea known geothermal resource area (KGRA) and is already readying a matching 49-megawatt Hudson Ranch II project, offered insight into the GEA’s positive attitude.

    “At some point,” Watson said of grid operators now buying up solar and wind contracts, “they’re going to want some grid stability [and] we’re running twenty-four hours a day. When the utilities get tired of dealing with intermittency and want baseload renewables, there’s really only one source -- and that’s geothermal."

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