NewEnergyNews: TODAY’S STUDY: SAVING WATER CAN CUT GREENHOUSE GASES

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Gleanings from the web and the world, condensed for convenience, illustrated for enlightenment, arranged for impact...

The challenge now: To make every day Earth Day.

YESTERDAY

THINGS-TO-THINK-ABOUT THURSDAY, December 1:

  • TTTA Thursday-First Daughter Ivanka May Fight For Climate
  • TTTA Thursday-Low Profile High Power Ocean Wind Energy
  • TTTA Thursday-A Visionary Solar Power Plant
  • TTTA Thursday-EVs Have A Growth Path
  • THE DAY BEFORE

  • ORIGINAL REPORTING: How The Clean Power Plan Drove The Utility Power Mix Transition
  • ORIGINAL REPORTING: How Utilities Are Answering The Distributed Energy Resources Challenge
  • ORIGINAL REPORTING: Looking At New Rates To Unlock The Utility Of The Future
  • THE DAY BEFORE THE DAY BEFORE

  • TODAY’S STUDY: The Power Potential Of Personal Wind
  • QUICK NEWS, November 29: Climate Change Forces Hard Choices In Alaska; New Energy To Utilities-“Can’t-Beat-Us-So-Join-Us”; Fact-Checking Trump Hot Air On Wind
  • THE DAY BEFORE THAT

  • TODAY’S STUDY: Getting More New Energy On The Grid
  • QUICK NEWS, November 28, 2016: Pope Talks Climate Change At Trump; Solar Comes To The Mall; The Big Possibilities Of Backyard Wind
  • AND THE DAY BEFORE THAT

  • Weekend Video: Why President Trump Can’t Stop New Energy
  • Weekend Video: 7 Things Climate Change Will Mean
  • Weekend Video: Wireless EV Charging Stations
  • THE LAST DAY UP HERE

  • FRIDAY WORLD HEADLINE-A Picture Of Climate Change
  • FRIDAY WORLD HEADLINE-Japan’s Toyota Targets Longer Range EV
  • FRIDAY WORLD HEADLINE-Spain’s Bay of Biscay Wave Harvest
  • FRIDAY WORLD HEADLINE-Morocco’s Green Revolution
  • --------------------------

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    Anne B. Butterfield of Daily Camera and Huffington Post, f is an occasional contributor to NewEnergyNews

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    Some of Anne's contributions:

  • Another Tipping Point: US Coal Supply Decline So Real Even West Virginia Concurs (REPORT), November 26, 2013
  • SOLAR FOR ME BUT NOT FOR THEE ~ Xcel's Push to Undermine Rooftop Solar, September 20, 2013
  • NEW BILLS AND NEW BIRDS in Colorado's recent session, May 20, 2013
  • Lies, damned lies and politicians (October 8, 2012)
  • Colorado's Elegant Solution to Fracking (April 23, 2012)
  • Shale Gas: From Geologic Bubble to Economic Bubble (March 15, 2012)
  • Taken for granted no more (February 5, 2012)
  • The Republican clown car circus (January 6, 2012)
  • Twenty-Somethings of Colorado With Skin in the Game (November 22, 2011)
  • Occupy, Xcel, and the Mother of All Cliffs (October 31, 2011)
  • Boulder Can Own Its Power With Distributed Generation (June 7, 2011)
  • The Plunging Cost of Renewables and Boulder's Energy Future (April 19, 2011)
  • Paddling Down the River Denial (January 12, 2011)
  • The Fox (News) That Jumped the Shark (December 16, 2010)
  • Click here for an archive of Butterfield columns

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    Some details about NewEnergyNews and the man behind the curtain: Herman K. Trabish, Agua Dulce, CA., Doctor with my hands, Writer with my head, Student of New Energy and Human Experience with my heart

    email: herman@NewEnergyNews.net

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      A tip of the NewEnergyNews cap to Phillip Garcia for crucial assistance in the design implementation of this site. Thanks, Phillip.

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    Pay a visit to the HARRY BOYKOFF page at Basketball Reference, sponsored by NewEnergyNews and Oil In Their Blood.

  • ---------------
  • FRIDAY WORLD, December 2:

  • Aussie Farmers Worrying About Climate Change
  • The Climate Change Solution At Hand, Part 1
  • The Climate Change Solution At Hand, Part 2
  • New Energy And Historic Buildings In Europe

    Wednesday, August 13, 2014

    TODAY’S STUDY: SAVING WATER CAN CUT GREENHOUSE GASES

    Capturing Synergies Between Water Conservation and Carbon Dioxide Emissions in the Power Sector

    Paul Faeth and Benjamin K. Sovacool, July 2014 (CAN Corp)

    Abstract

    In order to gain a more thorough understanding of potential conflicts and synergies between power generation and water use, we developed a mixed-integer linear programming model of the power sector that captures the key relationships with water. We used the model to develop a series of scenarios for each of four case studies—the North Grid of China, India, France, and the state of Texas in the United States. We found that cost-effective options exist that can cut water use, reduce risks to the power sector, and also reduce emissions of conventional pollutants and greenhouse gases from electricity generation. This report focuses on strategies we recommend to capture those synergies.

    Executive Summary

    Electricity generation from thermoelectric power plants is inextricably linked to water resources at nearly all stages in the power production cycle, yet this critical constraint has been largely overlooked in policy and planning. While this assumption suggests that water is inexpensive and abundant, global water resources are increasingly strained by economic development, population growth, and climate change. As demand increases, competition for limited water resources among the agricultural, industrial, municipal, and electric power sectors threatens to become acute in several global regions.

    Modeling the Electricity-Water Nexus

    In order to gain a more thorough understanding of potential conflicts and synergies between power generation and water use, we developed a mixed-integer linear programming model of the power sector that captures the key relationships with water. We used the model to develop a series of scenarios for each of four case studies—the North Grid of China, India, France, and the state of Texas in the United States. We chose these cases because water is posing challenges to power generation in each of them.

    We developed a baseline projection for each case study, and then modeled a number of scenarios, including limits on water availability, reduced power demand from end-use energy efficiency, expansion of renewable energy, and carbon caps, among others.

    Findings and Strategies to Address Water Challenges and Mitigate CO2 Emissions

    We found that cost-effective options exist that can cut water used in electricity generation and also reduce emissions of conventional pollutants and carbon dioxide. From the case study analysis, we developed a set of recommended strategies, presented in detail in this report:

    • Promote energy efficiency and demand-side management.

    • Deploy renewable energy technologies that do not require cooling.

    • Avoid building new freshwater-cooled thermoelectric power plants in water-stressed regions.

    • Improve monitoring, data collection, and analysis for policy, planning, and permitting.

    • Increase research and development support for advanced power sector technologies that reduce water use and provide other co-benefits.

    A companion report, A Clash of Competing Necessities: Water Adequacy and Electric Reliability in China, India, France, and Texas,describes the four case studies and the analysis that supports the recommendations above. Documentation of the model is provided in its appendix.

    Next Steps

    The intent of the research was to better appreciate the issues at play and put forward a set of strategies to reduce the dependence on water of the power sector, thereby enhancing its reliability as well as the water- and pollutant-related co-benefits that could be derived.

    It is critically important that policymakers, government officials, and other decision makers and reform advocates are aware of the significant reliability risks increasingly posed by water resource constraints. A key takeaway from the work reported here is that tools that enable the full consideration of water-related conflicts and synergies need to be developed and applied in order to avoid those future risks…

    Conclusion

    Electricity generation from thermoelectric power plants is inextricably linked to water resources at nearly all stages in the power production cycle, yet this critical constraint has been largely overlooked in policy and planning.

    While this omission suggests that water is inexpensive and abundant, global water resources are increasingly strained by economic development, population growth, and climate change.44 As demand increases, competition for limited water resources among the agricultural, industrial, municipal, and electric power sectors threatens to become acute in several global regions. It is critically important that policymakers, government officials, and other decisionmakers and reform advocates are aware of the significant reliability risks increasingly posed by water resource constraints.

    6

    We find though, that these risks can be managed in ways that are cost-effective and provide additional co-benefits, including improvements in air quality and reductions in greenhouse gases. Key approaches to do this include end-use energy efficiency; renewable energy that does not require cooling water, particularly wind; and a move away from coal to natural gas. Not all power production options provide these synergies. Nuclear power has air quality and climate mitigation benefits, but is very thirsty. Coal with carbon capture and sequestration requires considerably more water than does conventional coal.

    The intent of the exercise we reported here was to better understand the issues at play and develop strategies that could alleviate the challenges the power sector is likely to face as water resource availability becomes increasingly constrained.

    A key takeaway from this work is that tools that enable the full consideration of water-related conflicts and synergies—such as the CNA Electricity-Water Nexus model—need to be developed and applied in order to avoid future risks.

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