NewEnergyNews: TODAY’S STUDY: PROOF GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS ARE BEING DECOUPLED FROM ECONOMIC GROWTH

NewEnergyNews

Gleanings from the web and the world, condensed for convenience, illustrated for enlightenment, arranged for impact...

While the OFFICE of President remains in highest regard at NewEnergyNews, this administration's position on climate change makes it impossible to regard THIS president with respect. Below is the NewEnergyNews theme song until 2020.

The challenge now: To make every day Earth Day.

YESTERDAY

  • FRIDAY WORLD HEADLINE-When Countries Will Be Uninhabitable (From The Onion)
  • FRIDAY WORLD HEADLINE-China Solar Dominance Based On State-Backed Loans
  • FRIDAY WORLD HEADLINE-The Big Storage That Can Make Aussies 100% New Energy
  • FRIDAY WORLD HEADLINE-South Africa’s Power System Is Ready For New Energy
  • THE DAY BEFORE

    THINGS-TO-THINK-ABOUT THURSDAY, September 21:

  • TTTA Thursday-$20 MIL To Climate Fight From DiCaprio Fund
  • TTTA Thursday-Solar Energy Price Drop At Full Speed
  • TTTA Thursday-Wind Art Turns Climate Change Fighter
  • TTTA Thursday-When Self-Driving EVs Will Take Over
  • THE DAY BEFORE THE DAY BEFORE

  • ORIGINAL REPORTING: Is 100% renewable energy the best goal to cut power sector emissions?
  • ORIGINAL REPORTING: Have California's efforts to value distributed resources hit a roadblock?
  • THE DAY BEFORE THAT

  • TODAY’S STUDY: The Truth About The Transmission New Energy Needs
  • QUICK NEWS, September 19: All About Climate Change In 17 Short Answers; New Energy Ready To Step Up; How Old Energy Attacks Solar
  • AND THE DAY BEFORE THAT

  • TODAY’S STUDY: The Private Sector Gets Into The New Energy Biz
  • QUICK NEWS, September 18: The Key Climate Change Unknown; Beer Brewer Anheuser-Busch In Big Wind Buy; Montana Grew Solar 400% In 2016
  • THE LAST DAY UP HERE

  • Weekend Video: A Bill Maher Debate About The Climate
  • Weekend Video: Sweet Winds
  • Weekend Video: This Is Not Natural
  • --------------------------

    --------------------------

    Founding Editor Herman K. Trabish

    --------------------------

    --------------------------

    click image for more info about the Sunstock Solar Festival

    Research Associate and Contributing Editor Jessica R. Wunder

    --------------------------

    --------------------------

    --------------------------

    Some details about NewEnergyNews and the man behind the curtain: Herman K. Trabish, Agua Dulce, CA., Doctor with my hands, Writer with my head, Student of New Energy and Human Experience with my heart

    email: herman@NewEnergyNews.net

    -------------------

    -------------------

      A tip of the NewEnergyNews cap to Phillip Garcia for crucial assistance in the design implementation of this site. Thanks, Phillip.

    -------------------

    Pay a visit to the HARRY BOYKOFF page at Basketball Reference, sponsored by NewEnergyNews and Oil In Their Blood.

  • ---------------
  • WEEKEND VIDEOS, September 23-24:

  • The Daily Show On Eclipses And Climate Change
  • The President Plays A Plays Fossil Fool
  • The Age Of New Energy Storage Is At Hand

    Monday, October 05, 2015

    TODAY’S STUDY: PROOF GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS ARE BEING DECOUPLED FROM ECONOMIC GROWTH

    Turning point: Decoupling Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Economic Growth

    Lars Handrich, Claudia Kemfert, Anselm Mattes, Ferdinand Pavel, Thure Traber, September 2015 (DIW Econ)

    Executive Summary

    The transformation of economic growth towards a lower dependency on fossil fuels and related greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions is essential for the feasibility of a successful global climate strategy. The year 2014 was the first in decades that saw worldwide economic growth and a reduction of energy-related GHG emissions. This study attempts to explore these developments and illuminate the drivers through descriptive data analysis, a review of empirical research and a regression analysis. The assessment covers data for the period 1990 to 2014 and includes economic growth, energy-related GHG emissions, energy consumption and energy carriers for 34 countries. Particular emphasis is put on the often-cited examples of China, the US and Germany, which are then compared with the OECD aggregate, India and the worldwide picture.

    This study distinguishes weak and strong decoupling of energy consumption from economic growth to analyze specific evolutions. Weak decoupling is defined as a reduction of energy intensity, i.e., energy consumption per GDP, while absolute consumption still rises with economic growth. Strong decoupling is present, if total energy consumption falls with economic growth. Furthermore, this concept is applied to the analysis of decoupling from GHG emissions and to decoupling from conventional energy as the sum of nuclear and fossil energy consumption.

    Regarding the past decade, it turns out that global growth went along with an increase of energy use, and that despite a steady decrease of conventional energy intensity. This weak decoupling process was facilitated by greater energy efficiency and the roll-out of renewables. Since 2004, solar and wind have been the fastest growing energy sources worldwide, and they saw substantially accelerated growth over the last four years. This is true for China, India and the OECD group of countries. Moreover, our empirical assessment of the causal relationships suggests that renewables may even promote economic growth. For climate policy this presents an optimistic perspective. In particular, the OECD countries show a strong decoupling of conventional energy and of emissions over the last decade. As exemplified by Germany, a successful renewable energy strategy combined with substantial energy savings will result in substantial emissions reductions – and that despite the phasing out of nuclear energy.

    China and India are of particular importance for global trends due to their high growth rates. However, their growth follows diverging patterns. While on a continued economic growth path, China succeeded in a weak decoupling from conventional energy requirements and emissions. Moreover, strong decoupling seems possible in the near future. In 2014, China stopped the expansion of coal use and met the modest 3% growth in energy consumption mainly with less emission intensive energy sources such as natural gas, wind and solar power. By contrast, India’s renewable energy expansion is more than canceled out by investment in emission-intensive power sources, mainly coal-fired power plants.

    For the US, the second largest GHG emitter, the outlook is unclear. Although the US has successfully combined substantial economic growth with a reduction in total emissions, strong decoupling has not continued since 2012. If China succeeds to further reduce its emissions, this will send strong signals towards a global low-carbon transition.

    Conclusion

    We observe a global trend of weak decoupling of conventional energy from growth (measured as reduced conventional energy intensity) over the last five years. A global strong decoupling from energy-related emissions seems viable.

    Strong decoupling over the last decade with a reduction of total energy consumption and emissions despite economic growth is observed for the OECD countries.

    Since 2004, solar and wind are the fastest growing energy sources worldwide, and they saw substantially accelerated growth over the last four years.

    Germany, thanks to a substantial hike in energy efficiency over the last decade, exemplifies strong decoupling of energy and emissions. The rollout of renewables has more than compensated for the nuclear-phase out and the slight rise in coal usage after the financial crisis.

    In the US, absolute energy consumption has been growing lately, and shale gas usage and renewable energy may suffice only for a weak decoupling of emissions from growth. On a ten-year basis, total energy slightly decreased despite only moderate energy savings.

    China is on a weak decoupling course with decreasing energy requirements and emissions per additional GDP. Strong decoupling seems possible in the near future.

    In India, renewable energies are challenged by investment in conventional emission-intensive types of energy generation.

    China and India are particularly important for worldwide trends due to their high growth rates.

    An empirical causality analysis of panel data including the years 1990 to 2014 reveals bi-directional impacts between renewables, conventional energy and GDP, indicating a feed-back relationship. Substitutability of conventional energy by renewable energy together with growth effects of renewables gives support for a viable decoupling policy.

    0 Comments:

    Post a Comment

    << Home